Best Parenting Curriculums

General Curriculums:

  • Building a Healthy Start: A Parent Educator’s Manual for the I Am Your Child Video Series
    • Children’s ages: Birth through three years
    • Lesson plans include: communication, contentment, history, humor, optimism, resiliency, self-esteem, spirituality, unity and values
      Children’s ages: Pre-school
  • Building Strong Families
    • The 10- to 12-week program is targeted at limited-resource, limited-literacy parents of children newborn to age three. (How kids Develop, Helping kids to behave, Playing to Learn, Smart Living and Supplemental activities)
    • Children’s ages: Birth through 36 months
    • Target populations: General (currently evaluating African American and Latino families) Framework domains: Parent Development, Parent-Child Relationship, Early Childhood Development.
  • Developing Capable Young People
    • A ten-session, multimedia training process supported by a Leader’s Guide, Participant Workbook, textbooks, audio/video resources, a technical assistance network, and web site. It is based on a unique inductive learning model which emphasizes collaboration, unique relationships, and situations so that parents can achieve personal mastery. The program has proven to be unusually effective in accommodating ethnic and socio-culture diversity.
    • Children’s ages: Pre-school children
    • Framework domains: Parent-Child Relationship, Early Childhood Development, Family Development, Culture and Community
  • Discipline for Young Children
    • Discipline for Young Children is a five-part series designed to help parents of preschoolers ages two to six years develop a win-win approach to teaching responsible behavior. This series helps parents explore their individual parenting style; understand what to expect from their children at different ages and stages; develop effective discipline techniques; and raise the odds for responsible behavior from their children.
    • Children’s ages: Two through six
    • Framework domains: Parent-Child Relationship, Early Childhood Development, Family Development
  • Love and Limits: Parenting with Good Sense
    • Children’s ages: Two through six
    • Framework domains: Parent-Child Relationship, Early Childhood Development, Family Development
  • Nurturing Parenting Program
    • Competency-based lessons are designed to help adults acquire specific knowledge and skills that will improve their overall parenting. The competencies are measured in personal and family life style patterns, and in parenting knowledge, beliefs, and performance rating scales. The Nurturing Programs target all families at risk for abuse and neglect with children birth to 18 years. The programs have been adapted for special populations, including Hmong families, military families, Hispanic families, African- American families, teen parents, foster and adoptive families, families in alcohol treatment and recovery, parents with special learning needs, and families with children with health challenges.
    • Children’s ages: Birth through 18 years
    • Framework domains: Parent Development, Parent-Child Relationship, Early Childhood Development, Family Development, Culture and Community
  • Parenting Now Curriculum
    • A Group Based Positive Parenting Curriculum–Improving access to quality parenting education for parents.
    • Children’s ages: Birth through age six
    • Framework domains: Parent Development, Parent-Child Relationship, Early Childhood Development, Family Development, Culture and Community
  • Positive Parenting
    • A Parent Education Curriculum (with DVD) is a parent education package complete with parenting lessons supported by lesson guides, background information, parent handouts, learning aids, references, and DVD segments. Intended for parent educators, social service agencies, parenting organizations, Extension educators, schools, churches, etc., Positive Parenting addresses six important parenting topics: physical punishment, limits, consequences, listening, anger, and challenging behavior. This product has been reproduced from the original publication and comes in a 3-ring binder with a DVD.
  • Positive Parenting II
    • Toddler to Twelve, A Video-Based Parent Education Curriculum contains six parenting lessons supported by lesson guides, background information, parent handouts, learning aids, references and video segments. Comes with VHS video in 3-ring binder.
  • The Power of Feelings: Parenting with Emotional Intelligence
    • Help parents and caregivers increase emotional literacy — the foundation of emotional intelligence. This program will help them communicate with their children, recognize and manage emotions, and increase self-awareness.
    • Children’s ages: Birth through eighteen
    • Framework domains: Parent-Child Relationship, Early Childhood Development
  • Principles of Parenting
    • The thirteen publications emphasize basic principles of understanding, guiding, and encouraging children. Each publication is four to six pages in length, uses simple statements of principles and many stories to communicate the principles. The publications are made interesting and accessible by the use of many customized illustrations.
    • The three broad categories of the publications are strengthening the Parent, Developing the Caring Child, and Developing the Strong Child.
    • Help parents to understand and respect their children; provide skills for communicating, supporting, and guiding; help parents to respect their own needs.
  • Responsive Discipline
  • Strengthening Parent/Child Relationships
  • Working With Single Parent Families
  • Effective Black Parenting
    • CICC’s Effective Black Parenting Program (EBPP) is the country’s first culturally- adapted parenting skill-building program for parents of African American children. Its initial development in the 1970’s was stimulated by the fact that none of the then-existing parenting skill-building programs were designed specifically for African Americans. Children’s ages: Birth through eighteen
    • Target populations: African American
    • Framework domains: Parent Development, Parent-Child Relationship, Early Childhood Development, and Family Development and Culture and Community

 

Criteria for Evaluating and Selecting Parent Education Curriculum Materials
1. What is the overall purpose? Are there specific goals for parents and their children? 2. What is the theoretical orientation/conceptual basis for it?
3. Who is the object of focus – the parent, child, parent-child relationship, family, etc.? 4. Does it match the needs of the parent(s) with whom you will use it?
5. Is it targeted to a particular group of parents? Can it be adapted for use with other parents?
6. If it includes reading materials that you will share with parents, at what reading level is it? How complex are the thinking skills required of parents to understand it?
7. Is the material current, reflecting the latest research? This is likely more important than the date of publication if the material continues to be accurate.
8. What are the qualifications of the authors? Do they have professional preparation in areas related to parenting and parent education?
9. How does it address cultural differences? Can it be used across cultural groups? 10. What does it assume about the preparation of the parent educator?
11. How comprehensive is it? Does it include materials that can be used over several sessions with parent(s)?
12. What teaching strategies, if any, are suggested? If so, do they match the learning styles of the parent(s) with whom you would use it?
13. Is it easy to obtain? What does it cost? Can it be used multiple times?
Section Three
Five Sample Lesson Plans
Parent Education Core Curriculum Framework and Indicators for Parent Education Programs
Integrated Lesson Plan One: Parent Development
Teacher’s Name _________________________________________ Date ___________ Class Series ECFE General Parenting Class Session/Week Number _____ Class Topic: Family Mission Statements
“Having your destination clearly in mind affects every decision along the way.”
Steven Covey

  1. Domain, Component, Category, and Indicator(s)
    1. Domain: Parent Development
      b. Component and Category: Role of Parent, Parenting Philosophy
      c. Indicator(s) – Parents support their children’s development when they: Intentionally determine or identify their parenting philosophy and long term parenting goals to guide their child rearing decisions.
      2. Lesson Objectives to Achieve the Indicator(s) (3 maximum):
      a. To understand the importance of goals in parenting
      b. To identify their thoughts, ideas, goals and dreams for their children c. To build confidence in achieving goals
      3. Materials/References/Resources/Handouts Needed to Support the Lesson:
      References:
      Parenting: An Ecological Perspective edited by Tom Luster and Lynn Okagaki (Chapter One)
      The Ecology of Human Development by Uri Bronfenbrenner
      Developing Caring Relationships Among Parents, Children, Schools and Communities
      by Dana McDermott
      The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Families by Steven Covey (Habit Two)
      Handouts:
      Habits of Highly Effective Families Writing Mission Statements
      4. Parent-Child Interaction Questions/Activities:
      When you play with your child or watch your child playing…what are some of the things 12
  2. they have learned?
    (Activities set up in the room…play dough, painting, cut and paste projects, story corner,
    sensory table and free play areas)
    5. Child Development Link(s):
    Social and Emotional Development: Emotional Development, Self-Awareness and Self Regulation, Social Competence and Relationships
    Approaches to Learning: Curiosity, Risk-Taking, Imagination and Invention, Persistence and Reflection and Interpretation
    Language and Literacy: Listening, Speaking, Emergent Reading and Writing
    Physical and Motor Development: Gross Motor Development, Fine Motor Development,
    Physical Health and Well-Being
    6. Lesson Procedures:
    Guided Check-In and Review: Talk about last week’s topic for review. Ask about today’s question: What are some of the things your child has learned or is learning? Transition into today’s lesson plan:
    Introduction: This week we are going to be talking about our parenting philosophy. Hold up a road map. I’d like you to think about a road trip you’ve taken with your family. It could be a trip you went on as a child with your family, a trip you’ve been on with your own family, a trip you’d like to plan or a car trip across town to a new destination.
    Activity: With a partner share how you prepared for the trip, what you brought with or what you needed for your journey. Was it a successful journey? Did you learn anything along the way? (5 minutes)
    De-brief with the large group. What did you discover? (Possible answers, detour along the way, needed many supplies, got lost, ran out of games for the kids, needed a map and took longer than planned) Parenting is a journey just like a road trip: you need a map, there are many surprises along the way, there are detours, we need to be prepared, we need directions, and sometimes we get lost. However, there are ways to prepare for the parenting journey to keep you running on course.
    Content and Teaching Methods: One way to have a successful journey is to have a map. We’re going to create a parenting map today in the form of a mission statement. Have any of you written mission statements at work? Mission statements are goal statements of what you would like to accomplish. A mission statement can be just one sentence or it can be a paragraph. Our statements that we write today will contain what is important to us in raising our children. It will be a parenting road map of what you would like to teach your children. Hand out the handouts and discuss the handout on Steven Covey’s habit number 2.
    Activity: On your handout make a list of your strengths and abilities as parents. (Possible answers: compassionate, knowledgeable, understanding, empathetic,
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  3. patient, respectful, enthusiastic, or humorous) Ask the parents to give you some of their answers. Write answers down on the board.
    Now, let’s make a second list. Imagine your child at 18 years of age. Write down a list of the strengths and abilities you would like your children to have acquired. (Possible answers: compassion, understanding, motivation, respect, persistence, patience, great sense of humor, or disciplined) Ask the parents to give you some of their answers. Write several answers down on the board.
    Now, it’s time to write our mission statements by blending both of the lists together. (Example: I will use my creativity, compassion, knowledge and sense of humor to support my child’s growth and development in becoming a compassionate, creative, responsible citizen of the world.) Give the parents time to think and write.
    Summary/Closure: Ask the parents if they would be willing to read some of their statements.
    Home Application: Ask the parents to share this with their partners and see if they want to modify or enhance the statement. The statement should include both of their voices and concerns. Have them start thinking about how they would like to teach these skills to their children on a daily basis.
    7. Evaluation and Educator Reflection:
    Ask yourself these questions and write some notes to refer to for the following session:
     How do I know the identified lesson objectives were met?
    Participant’s body language, written mission statements and comments in the group
    discussions
     How did the learning activities work? What went well?
    Example: Parents wrote some terrific statements
    What did not go well?
    Example: Parents needed more time
     Notes for next week, including follow-up lessons or information needed. Begin by asking them how it went discussing the mission statement with their partners and if they changed their statements. Ask if anyone brought their revised statements to share. Lead them on to the next step, which is how do we teach our children so they learn these strengths? The next lesson plans should include topics such as brain development, general development, temperament and how children learn.
    NOTE: Attach all materials such as handouts, resources, home application reminder note, etc. If using a published lesson plan or one designed previously, write “see attached” and attach a copy of the plan to the form.
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Parent Education Core Curriculum Framework and Indicators for Parent Education Programs
Integrated Lesson Plan Two: Parent-Child Relationship
Teacher’s Name _________________________________________ Date ___________ Class Series ECFE General Parenting Class Session/Week Number _____ Class Topic: Identifying Feelings and Responding With Empathy
“To handle yourself use your head; to handle others use your heart.” unknown
1. Domain, Component, Category and Indicator(s):
a. Domain: Parent-Child Relationship
b. Component and Category: Relationship Skills, Sensitivity and Responsiveness c. Indicator(s) – Parents support their children’s development when they: Understand and empathize with their child’s perspective of a given situation and then use that understanding to respond.
2. Lesson Objectives to Achieve the Indicator(s) (3 maximum):
a. To identify emotions in self and child
b. To gain skills in responding with empathy and sensitivity
c. To gain awareness in recognizing and managing emotions in self and children
3. Materials/References/Resources/ Handouts Needed to Support the Lesson:
Materials:
The Way I Feel by Janan Cain Index cards
References:
Parenting: An Ecological Perspective edited by Tom Luster and Lynn Okagaki Chapter Thirteen
Developing Caring Relationships Among parents, Children, Schools and Communities by Dana McDermott Chapter Two
Bornstein Book Five, Chapter 5, Parenting and Children’s Pro-social and Moral Development
What am I feeling? and How to Raise an Emotionally Intelligent Child by John Gottman Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman
Handouts:
Feeling Faces Emotion Coaching
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4. Parent-Child Interaction Questions/Activities:
How is your child feeling today? What emotions have you noticed this morning? How does your child feel at school?
(Activities set up in the room…play dough, painting, cut and paste projects, story corner, sensory table and free play areas)
5. Child Development Link(s):
Social and Emotional Development: Emotional Development, Self-Awareness and Self Regulation, Social Competence and Relationships
6. Lesson Procedures:
Guided Check-In and Review: Talk about last week’s topic for review. Ask about today’s question: What is your child feeling today? Is your child feeling more than one feeling? Handout the feeling faces.
Transition into today’s lesson plan:
Introduction: This week we are going to talk about feelings. Read the children’s book, “The Way I Feel” by Janan Cain. Share with the parents a little bit of information about feelings. Such as: We all have emotions, emotions are meant to move and motivate us, everything we do and learn is shaped by our emotions, feelings are natural and a part of who we are as human beings, how we deal with our emotions has an impact on our lives and relationships, how we feel about our emotions was formed and shaped in our childhoods. Gottman…. “Research has found that children raised by parents who value and guide emotions do better in many ways: They form stronger friendships
They do better in school
They handle their moods better, have fewer negative emotions and bounce back from emotional events more quickly
They get sick less often
Small group: With a partner share your thoughts on this research. How do you feel about it? How are you feeling today? Hand out the handout of the faces. (5 minutes) De-brief with the large group. What did you discover? (Possible answers, I’d like to learn more about emotions, I’m afraid of emotions, I don’t know how to manage emotions or I’m feeling stressed)
Content and Teaching Methods: The first step in helping children to learn about their emotions is to recognize our own emotions. Then try and help your children to recognize how they feel. I shared with you 2 tools for learning about emotions one was to have a chart up and show the faces to your children and have them identify how they are feeling, another is to read stories about emotions and when you’re reading ask the child how the character in the book may be feeling.
Another method is responding with empathy. Empathy does not mean you agree with the child, it’s just acknowledging the child’s feelings or being able to put yourself in that other person’s shoes. Empathy sounds like……You sound like you are feeling
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frustrated or that must have really hurt, are you feeling disappointed? There are 5 steps in Dr. Gottman’s emotions coaching. The first step is to become aware of the child’s emotions. Hand out the handout on Gottman’s Emotion Coaching. Skim the handout.
Activity: Hand the parents an index card and have them write down a current scenario when their child was feeling a strong emotion. Look at your scenario card. How did you feel when this happened and how may your child be feeling? Share with a partner how you felt and how your child might have felt. (5 minutes) Ask for volunteers to share with the group their scenarios. Take the first scenario and model for the group what the empathy statement might sound like. (Example: Child falls down from their bike and runs in crying. As a parent you might feel worried or frightened. Then you notice your child is feeling hurt, sad, in pain, or scared. An empathy statement may be….Wow; your knee looks like it really hurts. Are you feeling okay?)
“Sixty-five percent of the time when someone’s upset all it takes is empathy to help someone calm down,” Tice (Goldman, 1995)
Ask for questions or comments. If time try and model a few more empathy statements or ask them for an empathy statement for their scenario.
Summary/Closure: What is the most important thing you learned today?
Home Application: Ask the parents to share this with their partners and practice labeling their feelings and their children’s feelings. This week practice labeling feelings and next week we’ll practice working on more empathy statements and being our child’s emotion coaches.
7. Evaluation and Educator Reflection:
Ask yourself these questions and write some notes to refer to for the following session:
 How do I know the identified lesson objectives were met? Participant’s body language, their involvement in the topic and comments in the
group discussions and summary
 How did the learning activities work? What went well?
Example: Parents seemed interested
What did not go well?
Example: Parents needed more time, they were overwhelmed with information
 Notes for next week, including follow-up lessons or information needed. Continue with empathy and work on empathy statements. Possibly share information from Faber and Mazlish’s How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk.
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NOTE: Attach all materials such as handouts, resources, home application reminder note, etc. If using a published lesson plan or one designed previously, write “see attached” and attach a copy of the plan to the form.
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Parent Education Core Curriculum Framework and Indicators for Parent Education Programs
Integrated Lesson Plan Three: Early Childhood Development
Teacher’s Name _________________________________________ Date ___________
Class Series ECFE General Parenting Class Session/Week Number _____
Class Topic: The Power of Play
“Silencing children’s play is as harmful to healthy development as hurrying them to grow up too fast too soon.” David Elkind
1. Domain, Component, Category and Indicator(s):
a. Domain: Early Childhood Development
b. Component and Category: General Child Development, Process of Development c. Indicator(s) – Parents support their children’s development when they: Understand that children learn, grow and develop by playing
2. Lesson Objectives to Achieve the Indicator(s) (3 maximum):
a. To understand the importance of play
b. To identify daily activities and the learning that takes place c. To increase children’s learning through play
3. Materials/References/Resources/ Handouts Needed to Support the Lesson:
Materials:
Ingredients to make play dough
References:
Bornstein manual five, chapter 9 entitled: Play in parent and child Interactions by Tamis et. al.
The Power of Play: How spontaneous, imaginative activities lead to happier, healthier children by David Elkind
The Importance of Play by K. Gindsberg Minnesota Early Learning Indicators Ask the Children by Ellen Galinsky
Handouts:
Parents as Educators Approaches to Learning Play-dough Recipe
4. Parent-Child Interaction Questions/Activities:
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What activities does your child gravitate toward when they come to school? What is the first activity they choose?
(Activities set up in the room…play dough, painting, cut and paste projects, story corner, sensory table and free play areas)
5. Child Development Link(s): All Domains
Social and Emotional Development: Emotional Development, Self-Awareness and Self Regulation, Social Competence and Relationships
Approaches to Learning: Curiosity, Risk-Taking, Imagination and Invention, Persistence and Reflection and Interpretation
Language and Literacy: Listening, Speaking, Emergent Reading and Writing
Physical and Motor Development: Gross Motor Development, Fine Motor Development,
Physical Health and Well-Being
6. Lesson Procedures:
Guided Check-In and Review: Talk about last week’s topic for review. Ask about
today’s question: What activities did your child gravitate toward when they came to school? What is the first activity they choose?
Transition into today’s lesson plan.
Introduction: This week we are going to be talking about how our children learn through play. So we’re going to begin by playing. Today we are going to make playdough.
Activity: Divide group up into 2 or 3 smaller groups. Have recipes and supplies to make 2 or 3 batches of playdough. Hand the participants the supplies and recipes. Let them work uninterrupted. When they are finished ask them in their groups to talk about what they or their children could have learned from this experience. (5 Minutes)
De-brief with the large group. What did you discover? (Possible answers, science skills, how to follow directions, how to work with others, social skills, math skills, reading skills, introvert or extrovert? Leader or follower? Anyone get frustrated? Did you have fun? Write the answers on the board.
Content and Teaching Methods: Recap the importance of play. Discus how play is critical for children’s healthy development. Introduce and discuss the early learning indicators: curiosity, risk taking, imagination and Invention, persistence and reflection, and interpretation. Hand out the handout on Approaches to Learning.
Activity: Have the parents in their groups read the handout and share how their children are learning curiosity, risk-taking etc. from their play experiences. Have the participants create a list of activities that can be added to their children’s learning experience through play. (Possible answers: Ask questions such as what might happen next? Let your children lead the play, provide opportunities to have make believe time, allow your children uninterrupted play time, allow your children to be
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free of fear from making mistakes, the sky can be the color green, or maybe just adding block or puzzle play, letting them help you cook, all activities can be fun and playful.)
Summary/Closure: De-brief in the large group parent’s answers. Write them on the board. Sum up: Children learn through play. Children’s work is play.
Home Application: Ask the parents to look at the list and make a conscious choice to add one of these ideas into their children’s activities this week. What are you willing to try or add to your children’s lives this week?
7. Evaluation and Educator Reflection:
Ask yourself these questions and write some notes to refer to for the following session:
 How do I know the identified lesson objectives were met?
Participant’s body language, participation and comments from the group discussions
 How did the learning activities work? What went well?
Example: Parents learned from making the playdough
What did not go well?
Example: Parents needed more time
 Notes for next week, including follow-up lessons or information needed. Parents may need more information on how the brain learns, optimum brain development or on creating enriched environments. Parents also need more classes on the Early Learning Indicators.
NOTE: Attach all materials such as handouts, resources, home application reminder note, etc. If using a published lesson plan or one designed previously, write “see attached” and attach a copy of the plan to the form.
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Parent Education Core Curriculum Framework and Indicators for Parent Education Programs
Integrated Lesson Plan Four: Family Development
Teacher’s Name _________________________________________ Date ___________
Class Series ECFE General Parenting Class Session/Week Number _____
Class Topic: Family Time!
“One of the core predictors of children’s well-being and academic success is how much time they spend eating with adults.” Bill Doherty
1. Domain, Component, Category and Indicator(s):
a. Domain: Family Development
b. Component and Category: Family Development, Family Traditions and Values c. Indicator(s) – Parents support their children’s development when they: Value and create family time together.
2. Lesson Objectives to Achieve the Indicator(s) (3 maximum):
a. To understand the importance of time together
b. To identify their thoughts, values and goals involving family time c. To determine how to build family time within complex schedules
3. Materials/References/Resources/Handouts Needed to Support the Lesson:
References:
The Intentional Family: How to build family ties in our modern world by Bill Doherty Putting Family First: Successful strategies for reclaiming family life in a hurry-up world
by Bill Doherty
Brain Matters by Pat Wolfe
Handouts:
Family Meal Time Research
4. Parent-Child Interaction Questions/Activities:
Does your child prefer to play with you, alone or with others? Is this behavior consistent wherever you go and at home? Does your child need more attention from you?
(Activities set up in the room…play dough, painting, cut and paste projects, story corner, sensory table and free play areas)
5. Child Development Link(s):
Social and Emotional Development: Emotional Development, Self-Awareness and Self Regulation, Social Competence and Relationships
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Approaches to Learning: Curiosity, Risk-Taking, Imagination and Invention, Persistence and Reflection and Interpretation
Language and Literacy: Listening, Speaking, Emergent Reading and Writing
6. Lesson Procedures:
Guided Check-In and Review: Talk about last week’s topic for review. Ask about today’s questions: Does your child prefer to play with you, alone or with others? Is this behavior consistent wherever you go and at home? Does your child need more attention from you?
Transition into today’s lesson plan:
Introduction: This week we are going to be talking about family time. Children need our time and attention. Children need quality and quantity time.
Activity: Hand out a piece of paper to each participant. Have them write down 3 numbers across the top of the page. The first number is for how many times yesterday their family all had a meal together. The second number is for all the times last week that the entire family had a meal together and the third number is for how many times a week the family would like to have a meal together. Then with a partner share your numbers. Ask do these numbers surprise you? Which was the second and third number close? What do these numbers tell you? (5 minutes)
De-brief with the large group. What did you discover? (Possible answers, we don’t get to have dinners together, my partner is always traveling, we are gone for the older children’s activities etc.) Post on the boards some of the barriers that prevent families from having dinner together.
Content and Teaching Methods: Hand out the handout on Columbia University. Discuss the information. Share information from Bill Doherty…”One of the core predictors of children’s well-being and academic success is how much time they spend eating with adults.”
Activity: On your handout make a list of your individual family barriers to having dinner more often. Then make a list of how you can get around some of the barriers. Share with a partner and add ideas to your list. (5 minutes)
Summary/Closure: De-brief with the large group. What did you discover? Post some of the answers on the board. Hand out the handout Family Meal Time for a review.
Home Application: Ask the parents to look at the board and choose one idea that they can work on this week to have at least one more family dinner together.
7. Evaluation and Educator Reflection:
Ask yourself these questions and write some notes to refer to for the following
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session:
 How do I know the identified lesson objectives were met?
Participant’s body language, answers and comments in the group discussions
 How did the learning activities work? What went well?
Example: Parents came up with some great solutions
What did not go well?
Example: Parents needed more time
 Notes for next week, including follow-up lessons or information needed. Begin by asking them if they were able to have more family dinners together. How did they accomplish this and how do they and their families feel? Follow up lessons could involve limiting television, family fun activities, meeting each child’s needs or self time etc.
NOTE: Attach all materials such as handouts, resources, home application reminder note, etc. If using a published lesson plan or one designed previously, write “see attached” and attach a copy of the plan to the form.
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Parent Education Core Curriculum Framework and Indicators for Parent Education Programs
Integrated Lesson Plan Five: Culture and Community
Teacher’s Name _________________________________________ Date ___________
Class Series ECFE General Parenting Class Session/Week Number _____
Class Topic: Media Exposure
“Media have taken over the lives of many kids, who spend more time in front of screens than doing anything else but sleeping.” David Walsh
1. Domain, Component, Category and Indicator(s):
a. Domain: Culture and Community
b. Component and Category: Societal and Global Forces, Media
c. Indicator(s) – Parents support their children’s development when they: Understand the impact of early media exposure on the brain’s neural network and development
2. Lesson Objectives to Achieve the Indicator(s) (3 maximum):
a. To understand the early impact of media on the young brain b. To understand the importance of limiting exposure
c. To gain skills understanding age appropriate content
3. Materials/References/Resources/Handouts Needed to Support the Lesson:
References:
NO: Why kids of all ages need to hear it and ways parents can say it by David Walsh Bornstein Manual 5 Chapter 14: Parenting in a Multimedia Society by Dorr, Rabin and Irlen
Handouts:
Parent Tool Kit-Media Wise Kids Media Wise Families
4. Parent-Child Interaction Questions/Activities:
Do your children learn from watching other children?
(Activities set up in the room…play dough, painting, cut and paste projects, story corner,
sensory table and free play areas)
5. Child Development Link(s):
Social and Emotional Development: Emotional Development, Self-Awareness and Self Regulation, Social Competence and Relationships
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Approaches to Learning: Curiosity, Risk-Taking, Imagination and Invention, Persistence and Reflection and Interpretation
6. Lesson Procedures:
Guided Check-In and Review: Talk about last week’s topic for review. Ask about today’s question: Do your children learn from watching other children?
Transition into today’s lesson plan:
Introduction: This week we are going to be talking about media in our culture and the impact that it has on our children.
Activity: Guided visualization. Today we’re going on a guided visualization. I’d like you to close your eyes and relax. Take a deep breath in and slowly blow it out. Take another breath in and out. Slowly, very slowly in….and out…. I’d like you to imagine you’re a child again. You are playing. See yourself. Think about how it felt to be a child. Now… remember back to a scary movie or television show that you saw. Did you ever see psycho, the birds, Halloween, or Freddy Kruger? Did you see any violent movies such as Braveheart or Lord of the Rings? Think of a show or movie that had an impact on you. See the movie. What does it look like? Hear what’s going on in the movie. How does it sound? Feel the movie. How does it feel? Slowly open your eyes. How are you feeling? Do you feel calm and relaxed any longer? Share with a partner how you felt and what you remembered. (5 minutes)
De-brief with the large group. What did you discover? (Possible answers, I no longer felt relaxed, scary feelings came flooding back, I was even scared from Disney movies) So what does this mean for our children?
Content and Teaching Methods: Talk about the influence media has on our children. Share information from No by David Walsh. Share a story or two from the book or personal experience. Children under 2 should not watch TV. They need to learn from words. Children over 2 should be monitored and watch less than 2 hours a day. Parents should watch TV with their children to share thoughts and ideas from the program.
Activity: Hand out Media wise kid’s questioner pg.260-261. Have them answer the questions and share their answers with a partner. Discus as a group their thoughts and share personal stories.
Summary/Closure: Then have them read through the does and don’ts on the handout Media Wise Families. Have them answer the questions. Share their thoughts as a review of the lesson
Home Application: Ask the parents to share this list with their partners and ask if there is anything on this list that they would be willing to try to become a media wise family.
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7. Evaluation and Educator Reflection:
Ask yourself these questions and write some notes to refer to for the following session:
 How do I know the identified lesson objectives were met? Participant’s body language, test answers and comments in the group discussions
 How did the learning activities work? What went well?
Example: Parents concerned and interested in helping to limit TV
What did not go well?
Example: Parents needed more time
 Notes for next week, including follow-up lessons or information needed. Ask how it went limiting TV or helping their children to make better choices on programming. For the future, to build on this lesson plan, talk about brain development and the recipe for optimal brain development.
NOTE: Attach all materials such as handouts, resources, home application reminder note, etc. If using a published lesson plan or one designed previously, write “see attached” and attach a copy of the plan to the form.
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Section Four
Ideas for Successful Parent-Child Interaction Time
Parent-child interaction time is an opportunity for parent educators to add depth and new meaning for parents. Parent-child interaction time provides many opportunities for the parent educator and children’s teacher to highlight the day’s activities, to preview topics in parent education, to provide ideas for home practice, to give new ideas for appropriate learning activities for children, for parents to practice new skills, for parents to observe their children, model acceptable behaviors for parents when interacting with their children, and provide quality time for families.
The most common tips parent educators share:
 Have a question of the day for parent-child interaction time.
 Model how to play and interact with children for the parents to observe.
 Tie parent-child interaction questions to the parenting lesson plan.
 Plan ahead with the children’s teacher on strategies and topics for the
families.
 Have signs up in the room that state what the children are learning when
they play with specific objects.
 Be present and open for questions and information.
Campbell and Palm recommend from their book, Group Parent Education: Promoting parent learning and support, (page 151, chapter nine) seven tips for designing effective parent-child interaction time:
Selecting and adapting parent-child activities
Create an environment that is sensitive to child development, with appropriate and engaging activities for different age groups.
Balance projects that are sensitive to both parent and child interests.
Offer a variety of activities to meet the needs and interests of different parents and children.
Preparing the environment
Have the early childhood teacher and parent educator work together to select activities Arrange activities to indicate space boundaries while also considering activity and noise levels.
Add a new twist to a favorite activity
Introducing and modeling activities
Verbally explain activities before parent-child time.
Write activities on small cards or signs for parents to read when they go to an activity area.
Have parent and early childhood educators circulate, explaining the purpose of each activity.
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Setting a positive tone
Help parents understand the expected roles and appropriate behavior.
Give parents clear descriptions and explanations about the purpose of parent-child time and expectations for parent and child behavior.
Model respectful interactions with children and describe how parents can help their children with an activity.
Clarifying parent roles
Explain to parents that it provides them with an opportunity to observe their child’s behavior in a different social context with peers and to discover new insights about their child’s interactions with others.
Point out to parents that they can be cooperative playmates who follow their child’s lead. Help parents see their role as a teacher or guide who demonstrates to their child how to complete a task and encourages his/her efforts through modeling or scaffolding tasks. Provide parent with explicit information about the roles that parent educators want them to play during parent-child interaction time through an initial orientation to the program and in a parent handbook.
Circle-time: Creating a group feeling
Vary the length of circle time according to the age of the child.
Recognize each child by name through a chant or song to begin circle time.
Selective intervention during parent-child time
Note parent strengths to acknowledge at a later time or child behaviors that can be discussed with the parents during parent discussion time.
Support parents and children who may be struggling with their own interaction, and intervene by making a simple comment to a parent to support their efforts or redirect both the parent and child.
Here are some sample questions Campbell and Palm recommend to begin a be-briefing with parents following parent-child interaction time: (page 172, chapter 9)
“What was it like for you playing with your child today?”
“What did you notice about your child’s choices?”
“How have things changed from earlier in the year during this time?” “How is it different playing here with your child than at home?” “What surprised you as you played with your child?”
If your parent-child time includes time for observation, Campbell and Palm also share these tips on guided observation of child behavior:
Select a focus for observation that matches the topic of group discussion.
Post the topic where parents can read it.
“Notice how your child gets his/her needs met.”
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“Watch for new social skills your child has acquired.”
Keep parents focused during the observation.
Design and maintain group rules of observation: Observation is quiet time
Put yourself in your child’s place to understand him/her. Watch the children and listen to their words.
Avoid judgments about your child
Note your own feelings as you observe.
Respect all of the children as you observe. Focus primarily on “what” is happening not “why.”
A parent educator from Rochester shared some common questions she uses for parent- child interaction time:
Theme: Mother’s day
Question for parent-child interaction time: Does your child see you take time off for rest or play as well as time for work?
Parent topic: Self-care
Theme: Bugs
Question for parent-child interaction time: What reaction do you model for your children when you see “Creepy, crawly things?”
Parenting topic: Need for family time, outdoor time or how children learn Parenting book: Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv
Theme: Transportation
Question for parent-child interaction time: How do you plan travel time with your children?
Parent topic: Learning activities for the car, setting your family up for successful trips, family time or rituals
Theme: Spring time changes
Question for parent-child interaction time: How are your children changing right now? What have you noticed lately?
Parent topic: Development
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Here is a list of questions developed by Carolyn Oldre from Mounds View ECFE. These questions were originally designed for work sampling, however, many of theses questions are excellent for use in parent-child interaction time.
Personal and Social Development
How does your child demonstrate comfort in his/her skills?
What actions does your child do that are self-directed? What choices does he/she make? What classroom rules and routines does your child follow?
Write down some examples of your child using materials as they were intended. (For example: using markers on paper.)
What do you see and hear your child doing during transitions? What do you think that means about his/her comfort level?
In what ways does your child show eagerness or curiosity? What does your child do when faced with a problem?
Write some examples of your child’s interactions with other children. Describe how your child reacts to familiar adults.
What actions or words does your child use that makes your think he/she is empathetic or caring for others?
How does your child react when faced with a conflict? What actions, if any, does he/she take?
Language and Literacy
Give an example of your child understanding directions.
Watch for examples of your child showing interest in reading activities.
Have you seen your child use scribbles to pretend to write? Collect some samples. Ask your child to re-tell a story or event told by the teacher.
Does your child speak clearly enough to be understood? Listen for examples of asking the teacher for help or requesting information from someone in class.
Social Studies
How does your child show that she/he recognizes her/his own characteristics? Does your child make comparisons to other children?
What ideas has your child expressed to you about families? How about what each family member is supposed to do?
Does your child notice people in the community? What does he/she say about them? In what ways is your child familiar with technology?
Scientific Thinking
How does your child use his/her senses to explore the classroom and/or the outside world? In what ways do you think your child “investigates”? Do you notice your child making
comparisons?
How does your child answer “what if ” questions? . Does your child seem interested or amazed at the world? How does he/she express it? Describe some of your child’s explanations of events.
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Physical Development
What activities does your child do that shows you his/her balance or muscle control?
What types of actions does your child do with his/her “small muscles” -in other words, his/her hands, fingers?
What types of art materials does your child use?
Are there ways that your child plays that tells you she/he can coordinate what is seen by the eye and how his/her hand moves? (Examples might be puzzles, drawing, putting on shoes)
What health and safety rules does your child know? What routines does he/she regularly follow?
Math
Does your child show curiosity about amounts of things or counting? Do you have examples of your child noticing patterns?
How is your child making order in his/her environment?
Have you noticed your child playing with toys or games that use shapes? (Blocks, lotto cards, matching games, shape sorters)
Give some examples of words that your child uses that tells you she/he understands the location of things. (“The animals are in the box.”)
Can you child guess/decide: which bucket is bigger? Which car will go faster?
Have you noticed your child having fun with measuring activities in the classroom? Does your child anticipate the daily routing -at home? at school?
What kinds of words does your child use to describe time, or the passing of time? The Arts
Have you noticed your child using an art material in more than one way? or using a variety? Describe your child when playing at the play dough table.
How has your child’s drawing and other art forms changed over the last year? )
What are some of your child’s favorite songs? Does he/she enjoy playing real or pretend musical instruments?
Does your child participate in finger plays and games? Does he/she have some favorites? . Watch your child move during music or large muscle time. Describe the movements. Does your child’s movement change if music is added to the experience?
Does your child talk about a classmate’s project? Does he/she notice a block structure or play dough creation made by someone else? What does he/she say about it?
How does your child react to a guest magician, puppet show, or musician?
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